Eat at Bett's

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Archive for the category “vegetarian”

Samosas

I found this recipe for Samosas this week, and had to share it. Delightful homemade version of the pretty standard Indian appetizer. It was really tasty!

FILLING:
Cooking spray
1/2 cup thinly sliced yellow onion
1 pound Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch cubes (about 3 cups)
1/2 cup chopped carrot
2 1/2 teaspoons red curry paste (I used curry powder)
1 garlic clove, minced
1 cup water
1/3 cup light coconut milk
2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
1/4 teaspoon salt

DOUGH:
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
6.75 ounces all-purpose flour (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 cup hot water
6 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
7 teaspoons peanut oil, divided

Preparation
To prepare filling, heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add onion and potatoes to pan; sauté 5 minutes or until onion is tender. Reduce heat to low. Add carrot, curry paste, and garlic to pan; cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add 1 cup water and coconut milk; bring to a simmer. Cook 15 minutes or until liquid almost evaporates and potatoes are tender. Stir in lime juice and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Transfer to a bowl; cool. Partially mash potato mixture with a fork.

To prepare dough, combine turmeric, ginger, and cinnamon in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook 30 seconds or until fragrant, stirring constantly. Transfer to a plate; cool.

Weigh or lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Place flour, toasted spices, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and baking soda in a food processor; pulse to combine. Combine 1/4 cup hot water, lemon juice, and 1 tablespoon peanut oil in a bowl. Add the hot water mixture through food chute with food processor on, and process until dough forms a ball. Place dough in a bowl coated with cooking spray, turning to coat top. Cover and let rest 15 minutes.

Divide dough into 12 equal portions. Working with 1 portion at a time (cover remaining dough to prevent drying), roll on a lightly floured surface to a 4-inch circle. Place 2 tablespoons filling in the center of each dough circle. Moisten edges of dough with water; fold dough over filling to make a half moon. Crimp edges with a fork to seal. Repeat with remaining 11 dough portions and filling to form 12 samosas.

Heat 2 teaspoons peanut oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 6 samosas to pan; cook 3 minutes or until golden brown. Turn and cook 3 minutes or until golden brown. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate. Repeat procedure with remaining 2 teaspoons peanut oil and remaining 6 samosas.

We ate it with store bought mango chutney!

Moroccan Roasted Vegetable Couscous

Melissa and I are not eating meat for Lent (3 days down, 43 to go! — for our reasoning, see my Rambling Priest blog) and have been looking at all sorts of meatless recipes that are more than rice and beans or pasta.  Cooking Light (I’m starting to feel like a shill for them) has some great ethnic vegetarian options.  We’ve both traveled to Morocco so this one seemed like a wonderful place to start.  The parsnips were slightly spicy for me personally, but Mel liked them.  I may make it with potato next time instead or another root type vegetable (fennel, or turnip?).
This tasted authentic to be sure, and I made one big variation, (which I’ll note below): I kicked up the spices to 3 teaspoons from 1.  This was a good solid recipe and we’ll do it again in the coming weeks!

Ingredients
COUSCOUS:
5 cups diced peeled sweet potato (about 1 1/2 pounds)
2 cups (1/2-inch) diced peeled parsnips (about 10 ounces)
1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon Ras el Hanout (See below for mixture — I used 3 teaspoons)
3 carrots, peeled and cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces (about 9 ounces)
1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1 1/4 cups organic vegetable broth
1 cup uncooked couscous (I used a Far East box and upped the broth to 2 cups per the box)
1 (15-ounce) can no-salt-added chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained

TOPPING: (This was delightful, and gave a sweet edge to this)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 yellow onion, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices, separated into rings
1/4 cup pine nuts (we used small pumpkin seeds–pine nuts were $16 a pound!)
1/4 cup raisins
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon honey

Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 450°.

2. To prepare couscous, combine the first 5 ingredients in a large bowl; stir in 1/2 teaspoon salt. Place potato mixture on a baking sheet. Bake at 450° for 30 minutes or until the vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally.

3. Bring broth to a boil in a medium saucepan. Stir in couscous and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt. Remove from heat; cover and let stand 10 minutes. Fluff with a fork; gently stir in chickpeas. Keep warm.

4. To prepare topping, heat 1 tablespoon oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add onion to pan; cook 12 minutes or until tender and golden brown, stirring occasionally. Add pine nuts and raisins; cook 2 minutes. Stir in cinnamon; cook 30 seconds. Stir in honey, and remove from heat.

5. Mound couscous in the middle of a serving platter. Place the roasted vegetables around base of couscous. Arrange 5 carrots vertically around couscous; spoon topping over top of couscous.

Ras el Hanout
Yield
1/4 cup (serving size: 1/4 teaspoon)

Ingredients
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground red pepper
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon saffron threads, crushed (I didn’t bother since I didn’t have them)
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

Preparation
1. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 month.

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